About Colin Talbot

Colin Talbot is Emeritus Professor of Government at the University of Manchester, a research associate at the University of Cambridge and a Senior Research Fellow with the Federal Trust.
2 09, 2021

Democratic federalism: are we there yet?

By |2021-09-02T14:37:09+00:00September 2nd, 2021|Categories: Blog, Brexit, Devolution, Federalism, Scotland, UK Constitution|Tags: , , , , |

This article was first published by The UK in a Changing Europe.   If there is one plus to the Covid-19 pandemic it is that many more people in the UK are aware we no longer live in a state with a single government in London. The regular TV appearances [...]

12 08, 2021

Making Public Value Management a guiding idea will be difficult within the UK’s dysfunctional hybrid governance system

By |2021-08-12T14:59:07+00:00August 12th, 2021|Categories: Devolution, Federalism, Scotland, UK, UK Constitution, Views from the Federal Trust|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

This article was first published by the LSE British Politics and Policy Blog In a recent blog, Arno van der Zwet and John Connolly make a persuasive case for ‘doing government better’ by embracing ‘public value management’ (PVM). Of course, PVM is not exactly new. I wrote about ‘public value’ as [...]

24 06, 2021

What the Whitehall-focused ‘Declaration On Government Reform’ gets wrong

By |2021-06-24T12:33:57+00:00June 24th, 2021|Categories: Blog|

This article was first published by Civil Service World.   The Government have very quietly published a grandly title “Declaration On Government Reform”, signed by the Prime Minister and Cabinet Secretary no less. It was apparently agreed at a meeting of the whole Cabinet with all Permanent Secretaries in attendance. [...]

28 05, 2021

Sovereign Conquest?

By |2021-05-28T11:17:08+00:00May 28th, 2021|Categories: Brexit, Coronavirus, Devolution, Federalism, Federalism, Scotland, UK Constitution, UK Devolution|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

“Take back control” was one of the main battle-cries of Brexit. Underpinning it was the notion that the UK had ceded its sovereignty to the EU and was no-longer an ‘independent’ country. We will leave aside the issue of whether or not Brexit really represents a return of sovereignty to [...]

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